Karens Variety

 

Newsletter January 2016

 

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FREE PATTERNS

 

Flower Motif
Tatting

Golden Crown Flower Motif
Crochet

 

A delicate tatted motif resembling an open flower.

A motif crocheted in white or three colours resembling a golden crown set in a flower.

Clutch Bag
Crochet

Daisy Table Setting
Sewing

Crochet a pouch bag to carry shopping or use as an evening bag; decorate as you wish.

A lovely table setting with centerpiece, place mats and beverage mats, shaped like daisy flowers.

Other Issues

 

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Sewing Information Basic Hand Stitches


by KarensVariety.com

 

Back Stitch
Make one running stitch, then take a back stitch to the beginning of the first stitch, thus overlapping each running stitch. Resembles machine stitching and is used to strengthen a seam made by hand.
Basting
Basting is quite important in successful sewing. This is used to hold fabric temporarily in place, until permanently stitched. There are four types of basting; hand basting, machine basting, pin basting and basting edges with an iron.
Hand basting is made by making longer running stitches. A glazed or waxed thread that will not snarl is best, since usually a long length is used.
Machine basting is quite popular. Simply lengthen the stitch and loosen tension. It holds ruffles and gathers in place and helps to keep bias edges from stretching.
Pin basting is used more on long, straight seams. Place pins at right angles to the seam edge with the heads of pins to the right, thus making it easy to remove the pins when stitching. Be careful not to pull or stretch fabric as you work.
Binding
Use either bias tape or regular twill or rayon tape. Bias tape is good for rounded pieces of fabric. Twill or rayon tape is good for binding straight pieces of fabric. Crease the piece of tape in the middle and put the edge of the piece of fabric that s to be bound between the folds of the tape. Sew on the rape, being sure to catch both sides of it, with a running stitch.
Blanket Stitch
Put your needle in 1/4 inch from the edge of the fabric, put the thread under the point of the needle and pull through.
Blanket Stitch Long and Short
Put your needle in 1/4 inch from the edge of the fabric for the long stitch and 1/8 inch away for the short stitch, put the thread under the point of the needle and pull through.
Catch Stitch
This is used for a flat finish next to fabric, such as seam binding on a hem. Hold open hem edge away from you, work from left to right, Take a stitch in the hem, then a tiny stitch to the right just beyond edge of hem with the point of needle to the left. This makes diagonal lined that cross each other.
Chain Stitch
Insert the needle in and out of the fabric (as in the running stitch). Bring the thread under the tip of the needle while still in the fabric, then pull the needle through.
Hemming
The open side of hem is held toward you, work from right to left, catch a very small stitch in the garment and a slightly deeper stitch in hem as shown. You want to achieve as nearly as possible an invisible stitch on the right side. These stitches may be close together for greater strength or spaced further apart.
Pressing seams with an iron is used mostly to hold straight edges such as pocket seams, yokes, or hems. Simply turn under desired amount and press.
Outline Stitch
This stitch is similar to the back stitch but it is slanted. Make one slanted backstitch in front of another letting each one overlap the one before it just a little bit, until the design is filled.
Overcasting
This is the sewing over and over of edges to prevent raveling and fraying. Work from right to left and make stitches about 1/8 inch deep and 1/4 inch apart.
Running Stitch
To make this stitch, push point of needle in and out of fabric until you have several stitches on the needle. Hold fabric taut with left hand, pull the needle through. Practice until you make fine even stitches.
Shirring
Cut a strong thread long enough to run the entire length of the fabric. Sew a fairly large running stitch in a straight line across. About 1/4 inch below this row make another row of running stitches. Take the loose pieces of thread at the ends of the two rows of sewing and pull them very carefully and slowly. When you have gathered the fabric to the desired width, tie the loose threads several times. Even out the folds.
Slip Stitch
A kind of hemming stitch. The stitches on both right and wrong sides should be practically invisible. Take a small stitch in the garment, run the point of the needle in fold of hem about a quarter inch, pull out needle, take another small stitch in fabric and continue as before. Hems are sometimes slip stitched and linings are fastened to inside of coats in this manner.

 

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Elephant Stuffed Toy


Free Sewing Pattern by KarensVariety.com

Materials: Felt or other material which does not unravel.
Beads or craft eyes.
Cotton batting.
Crochet cotton or sewing thread.
Sewing needle.

Make this elephant toy as big or as small as you want simply by enlarging or reducing the pattern sheet before you print. Try different colour schemes; gray elephant with black stitching, red saddle and eyes.

Cut two of each piece, body, ears and saddle. You may either sew together and turn inside out or if using felt, sew with overcast stitches in contrasting colour. Stuff with cotton batting before final stitching. Sew ears to each side of head where indicated and sew saddle on each side. Sew eyes on each side of head.

Make in different colours, embroider a child’s name on the saddle and and you have a toy for a loot bag or stocking stuffer.

Try adding to the elephant to make a circus elephant. Stitch a ribbon around the head and insert feathers, dangling jewels (an old earring). Add fringe to the saddle. Be creative and you will have a decorative item rather than a toy.

When putting on eyes or other decorations, remember not to give to a young child as a toy, as they can choke on small parts.

 

Reprints: Please feel free to link to this page. Please do not reproduce this page on the Internet; you may link to it instead. You may print this page for your own personal use but not for commercial use or distribution.

 

Flower Charts Filet Crochet Cross Stitch Embroidery


Free Patterns by KarensVariety.com

A rose, a five-petal flower and tulips to filet crochet, cross stitch or embroider. Use them to decorate linens such as towels, curtains, sheets and pillow cases, or embellish your clothing with edging, on pockets, aprons or dresses.

Each prints on an individual page. Choose your colour combinations and vary the size by using different sizes of yarn, thread or floss.

Reprints: Please feel free to link to this page. Please do not reproduce this page on the Internet; you may link to it instead. You may print this page for your own personal use but not for commercial use or distribution.

Lacy Edging


Free Knitting Pattern
by KarensVariety.com

Materials: No. 13 or 14 knitting needles
Size 30 crochet thread
– choose larger sizes if you wish for a heavier edging
Abbreviations:
 k  knit
 p  purl
 st(s)  stitch(es)
 O  yarn over
 tog  together
 eyelet  k 2 tog, O twice, k 2 tog
 edge  k 4, O, k 2 tog

A lacey scalloped edging to knit with centre reminiscent of flower petals for use on towels, sheets and pillowcases, clothing or afghans. Use fine cotton thread and needles to create a delicate edging or use larger needles and heavier yarn to edge afghans, blankets or towels.

Row 1: K 4, O, k 2 tog, k 6, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 2: O, k 11, (edge of O, k 2 tog, k 2)

Row 3: Edge, k 7, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 4: O, k 12, (O, k 2 tog, k 2)

Row 5: Edge, k 2, eyelet, k 2, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 6: O, k 7, p 1, k 5, (O, k 2 tog, k 2)

Row 7: Edge, eyelet twice, k 1, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 8: O, k 6, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, edge

Row 9: Edge, k 3, slip the next 2 sts on an extra needle, wind thread around these 2 sts 12 times, then slip the sts back on original needle and k them, k 5, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 10: O, k 2 tog, k 13, edge

Row 11: Edge, eyelet twice, k 2 tog, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 12: O, k 2 tog, k 4, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, edge

Row 13: Edge, k 2, eyelet, k 1, k 2 tog, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 14: O, k 2 tog, k 5, p 1,  k 5, edge

Row 15: Edge, k 6, k 2 tog, O, k 2 tog, k 1

Row 16: O, k 2 tog, k 1, k 2 tog, k 7, edge

Row 17: 15 sts on needle – same as Row 1.

Continue these rows for desired length.

Reprints: Please feel free to link to this page. Please do not reproduce this page on the Internet; you may link to it instead. You may print this page for your own personal use but not for commercial use or distribution.

 

Christmas Star Quilt


Free Pattern By KarensVariety.com

Sew a star quilt for Christmas from blocks using your choice of colours. For a quilt measuring about 91 x 105 inches, with 11 blocks across and 13 strips up and down, alternate 72 pieced blocks with 71 plain blocks of the same size and add a double border (two strips, cut about 4 inches wide) all around. Assemble the block in strips, then sew the strips together with 1/4 inch seams.

Double Irish Chain Quilt


Free Pattern
by KarensVariety.com

Size: 82 x 102 inches
Materials: 4 1/3 yards colour
5 1/2 yards white
1 1/2 yards for the 6 inch border

Make this popular Double Irish Chain Quilt by piecing appliqued shamrocks, hearts and bows to quilt squares.

Patchwork is a wonderful way to use scraps of fabric or old clothing. It was very popular during the depression and has become popular once again as a form of recycling. Pieces of fabric are sewn together into a design which are then usually quilted.

Patchwork is usually used to make quilts, but it can be used to make hand bags, clothing such as jackets or skirts. It can be embellished with embroidery or trim.

If you are artistic, you can design your own pattern, however there are many established patterns to choose from, each with a distinctive design and each with different variations.

Irish Chain quilts are a combination of different blocks pieced together. Variations include the Single, Double and Triple Irish Chain. Each uses a pieced and plain block sewn together in rows while giving the illusion of being sewn on the bias.

Trace each pattern on cardboard and cut out. Piece the blocks as illustrated, using white and a colour you choose. Colour is used for the shamrock and squares appliqued to the plain block; this is the same size as the pieced block. Alternate pieced with appliqued blocks. The bow and scallop makes a pretty border in any width from 6 inches up. Make the scallops of plain colour and the bows of a lighter shade.

Twenty-five 2 1/2 inch squares are required for each pieced block; 13 white and 12 coloured. One-quarter inch seams are allowed resulting in 2-inch squares; a complete block is 10 inches square.

A quilt of about 82 x 102 inches will result if 32 pieced blocks are used alternately with 31 plain white, or the white block with four 2-inch squares and shamrocks appliqued as shown. Use a 6-inch border all around and applique bows and scallops to this. 32 of each are required.

You will need about 4 1/3 yards of colour; 5 1/2 yards of white, and 1 1/2 yards for the 6 inch border.

 

Reprints: Please feel free to link to this page. Please do not reproduce this page on the Internet; you may link to it instead. You may print this page for your own personal use but not for commercial use or distribution.

 

 

Coat or Chemise Dress


Vogue 1950s Vintage Sewing Pattern

1953 Vogue 7940
Easy-to-Make

Size 12
Bust 30
Hip 33

Pre-cut 1950s vintage sewing pattern to sew misses chemise dress or unlined coat. Front may be buttoned from neck to hem for chemise dress. Stand up band collar. Two large patch pockets with flaps. Three quarter length kimono sleeves or sleeveless. Novelty belt.

$28.00

         

Go to all Vintage Sewing Patterns,
Women – Outerwear

 

Forget-Me-Not Edging


Free Crochet Pattern by KarensVariety.com

Materials: No. 30 crochet thread
Size 9 hook or finer
Tip: Where petals and diagonal lines join, a slip stitch may be used, but the effect is much prettier if the hook is removed from the work, inserted in the petal and the stitch drawn through without turning the work. This gives a right and wrong side.
Abbreviations:
 ch  chain
 sl st  slip stitch
 sk  skip
 dc  double crochet
 sp  space

Ch 11, sl st into fifth st from hook to form centre ring or circle, ch 3, sl st in third ch beyond sl st just made, ch 3, turn, sl st in centre. This makes 3 stitches of a 4 st petal; make another petal (ch 3, 2 dc, ch 3, sl st) into centre; ch 3, 1 dc in centre.

This has made half a flower; ch 15, * s st in fifth ch from hook for centre, ch 3, sl st in third ch from sl st, ch 3, turn, sl st in centre. Make 3 complete petals – repeat sts in parentheses for each petal – ch 3, sl st at tip of first petal, ch 7, sl st to point from which other ch 7 was made. 1 dc in centre, ch 3, sl st in centre to complete third petal of first flower, make a fourth petal, ch 3, sl st into tip of first petal to complete it. *

Ch 5, sk 2 ch, dc for a sp, ch 8, turn. Dc over previous dc, ch 2, dc into centre st of ch 5; ch 4, sl st into tip of free petal, or remove hook, insert in petal and draw st through, ch 11 for new flower, sl st into fifth ch from hook, ch 3, sl st into third ch from sl st, ch 3, turn, sl st into centre.

Ch 3 to begin new petal, dc in centre, sl st into middle st of long ch (ch 7), dc into centre, ch 3, sl st to centre. Start a new petal with ch 3, dc in centre, then ch 4, remove hook, insert in middle or tip of next petal of end flower, draw loop through and ch 11.

Work another flower as from * to *.

You now have completed the second row of two flowers, ch 7 and sl st to point where other ch 7 joins dc sp.

Ch 5, dc in next dc, ch 8 for loop, turn, dc into dc, ch 2, dc in middle st of ch 5 sp. To begin next row of flowers, ch 8, sl st in fifth st from hook, ch 3, sl st to third ch from sl st to form petal, ch 3, sl st to centre; make half of next petal, sl st to ch 7 by removing hook and picking up middle st, complete petal. Make half the next petal, ch 4, join in tip of petal below, ch 11 to start a new flower, connecting as before.

When increasing number of flowers to a row always work half of each flower, then complete outside flower and finish others as you work back to sps. As you work along, all will seem easier and you can make width changes as desired.

 

Reprints: Please feel free to link to this page. Please do not reproduce this page on the Internet; you may link to it instead. You may print this page for your own personal use but not for commercial use or distribution.